The Jewish Week is always here for you.
We need your support now.
Your contribution will help us bring you vital news
and frequent updates about the impact of COVID-19.
Trump’s NY doctor dies • Dr. Ruth gets vaccine • Sheldon Adelson buried in Jerusalem
search
Daily Update

Trump’s NY doctor dies • Dr. Ruth gets vaccine • Sheldon Adelson buried in Jerusalem

FLAGGING HATE: NYS Assemblymember Yuh
Line Niou speaks at a vigil at the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, in a show of solidarity after a person or persons tied a Confederate flag to the front door last week. Looking on are, left to right, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, NYS
Senator Brad Hoylman, Rep Carolyn Maloney and museum
president and CEO Jack Kliger, Jan. 14, 2021. Courtesy)
FLAGGING HATE: NYS Assemblymember Yuh Line Niou speaks at a vigil at the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, in a show of solidarity after a person or persons tied a Confederate flag to the front door last week. Looking on are, left to right, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, NYS Senator Brad Hoylman, Rep Carolyn Maloney and museum president and CEO Jack Kliger, Jan. 14, 2021. Courtesy)

 

The Jewish Center synagogue in Manhattan has set up a resource page to help as many people as possible navigate the system and schedule appointments for a Covid-19 vaccination.

The JC resource page includes links to vaccination booking sites and a tip line to share information about available appointments or other resources. The synagogue has also created a vaccine task force to help ensure that everyone has the help they need to make appointments.

Related: The New York Times reports on the frustrations of older people who have “become lost in the confusing system set up by the city and the state” to administer Covid-19 vaccinations. “Buggy websites, multiple sign-up systems that act in parallel but do not link together and a lack of outreach are causing exasperation and exhaustion among older New Yorkers and others trying to set up vaccination appointments,” the Times reports.

Kristen Clarke, Joe Biden’s nominee to head the civil rights division at the Justice Department, says she erred in inviting an anti-Semitic author to speak while at Harvard.

In 1994, as the leader of Harvard’s Black Student Association, Clarke invited Tony Martin, author of a book called “The Jewish Onslaught,” to speak and defended him afterward. Jews on campus at the time were appalled by the invitation.

“Giving someone like him a platform, it’s not something I would do again,” she told the Forward on Thursday. Clarke, the president of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, has worked closely in recent years with Jewish groups in combatting white supremacists.

Long Island’s Newsday called on Rep. Lee Zeldin to refute the president’s lies about a stolen election.

The Jewish Republican defended Trump during Wednesday’s House debate to impeach the president for inciting last week’s riot at the Capitol. Zeldin has frequently raised questions about the integrity of the 2020 election despite a lack of evidence and the failure of nearly all court challenges by Trump’s camp.

“Zeldin can still use his sizable platform — bolstered in part through allegiance to Trump — to unambiguously tell those people that the election was not stolen,” Newsday editorialized. “He must explain that any small irregularities had no chance of changing the outcome. It’s time to disavow the conspiracy theories.”

Harold Bornstein, Donald Trump’s former New York physician, is dead at 73. 

The long-haired Bornstein is best known for a 2016 letter declaring Trump “unequivocally the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency” — a letter that turned out to have been written by Trump.

The hyperbole in Bornstein’s letter — Trump’s blood pressure was “astonishingly excellent,” it said — raised eyebrows. Bornstein vigorously insisted he had penned the letter, but in 2018 revealed that Trump indeed had dictated it.

Bornstein and Trump had fallen out; the Trump campaign supposedly cut him off because he had spoken to the media.

A gastroenterologist who inherited Trump as a patient from his father, Bornstein was on staff at Lenox Hill Hospital. He lived in Scarsdale.

Sheldon Adelson was buried today at the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem.

The Las Vegas-based casino magnate, one of the world’s richest men, a major giver to Jewish causes and a Republican kingmaker, died Monday at age 87.

Related: JTA has a full obituary of Adelson. The New York Times asks whether Adelson’s death will complicate Republican efforts to regain control of Congress. The Forward looks at his Jewish philanthropic legacy, and asks what’s next.

Dr. Ruth Westheimer was vaccinated against the coronavirus at Manhattan’s Jacob Javits Center on Wednesday.

“I was a little scared to tell the truth, [but] it’s nothing,” the 92-year-old said in a video shared on Twitter by Melissa DeRosa, a top aide to Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Related: Nearly 2 million Israelis have received their first dose of the vaccine — by far the highest vaccination rate in the world, according to the Our World In Data website. Starting Sunday, all Israelis over the age of 45 will be eligible to receive the first Covid-19 shot.

Opinion

Rabbi Joshua M. Davidson of Manhattan’s Congregation Emanu-El has been convening small groups of congregants for a series of Zoom chats called “Jewish Life After Covid.” His findings provide a blueprint for innovation after the pandemic subsides.

Baking with friends over Zoom is one teenager’s way to escape the quarantine blues. Natalie Mendelsohn, a contributor to the Jewish Week’s Fresh Ink magazine for and by teens, writes that challah “restored my happiness in 2020 many times.”

Shabbat Shalom

How were the patriarchs capable of clinging to their faith even in catastrophic times? In the face of dire circumstances, writes Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinreb, “They knew how to celebrate blessings, large and small, with gratitude and joy.”

More wisdom: The Jewish way of being in the world is about ethics, but it is never about ethics alone. “It is also about a language and relationship to God, to one’s own soul and to one another,” writes Rabbi David Wolpe.

Around the Agencies

The Jewish Education Project is offering its three-session course on how Jewish educators and leaders can create community online. Led by Mindy Gold, founder and lead consultant of EdtechMMG, an education consulting firm, sessions will be February 4, 9, and 11. Register here.
Be’chol Lashon, the group raising awareness about the ethnic, racial and cultural diversity of Jewish people, named Marcella White Campbell as its new executive director. The San Francisco native has served as the organization’s marketing director for the last six years. Founding director Diane Tobin is stepping down after 20 years. Read an interview with Campbell here.

MLK Day Events

UJA-Federation of NY presents “Soul to Soul,” an annual concert in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. by National Yiddish Theater Folksbiene at Museum of Jewish Heritage. The virtual concert will explore the intersections between African-American and Yiddish musical traditions during the Civil Rights Era. Tickets are free. Jan. 17, 6:00 pm.

UJA-Federation of NY, in partnership with The Shalom Hartman Institute, is streaming a morning of learning in honor of MLK Day, with leading scholars about Judaism, justice and our role in pursuing a more equitable world. A panel discussion will bring together a diverse group of advocates for racial equity who will discuss the moral imperative to end systemic racism and pursue justice in our country and throughout the world. Register here. Jan. 18, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm.

Marlene Meyerson JCC streams “John Lewis: Good Trouble,” with a conversation about the documentary with Wanda Mosley, senior state coordinator, Black Voters Matter and Myrna Perez, director voting rights and elections, the Brennan Center for Justice. The conversation will be moderated by Brittany Luse, co-host of The Nod podcast. The screening is the closing night event in The Cinematters: NY Social Justice Film Festival, presenting films that, in the spirit of Dr. King’s legacy, promote social action that leads to positive change. Tickets $5. Jan 18, 6:00 pm.

Streaming

National Library of Israel presents Gal Sofer in a discussion of magical texts in which demons are summoned to assist magicians in their work. From the late medieval period onwards, such texts present the demons as deceptive and malicious creatures, while introducing the magician as a powerful figure who is able to bend them to his will. Sofer is an MD/Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Jewish Thought & Joyce and Irving Goldman Medical School at Ben-Gurion University. Register here. Sunday, 12:00 pm.

America-Israel Friendship League presents a panel of former NFL players as well as current coaches, players and leaders in the Israel Football League, discussing how American football is now a popular pastime for both players and fans in Israel. Register here. Sunday, 12:00 pm.

Join us on Jan. 25 as The Folio: A Jewish Week/UJA Cultural Series presents a virtual conversation with Nicole Krauss, author most recently of “To Be a Man,” her first collection of stories, and Eshkol Nevo, whose latest novel is “The Last Interview.” Moderated by award-winning author and editor Sandee Brawarsky. Register here.

read more:
comments