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Suits claim discrimination against Orthodox Jews • Israeli baseball team douses NYFD • Have fun with ‘Lego Jerry’
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Suits claim discrimination against Orthodox Jews • Israeli baseball team douses NYFD • Have fun with ‘Lego Jerry’

Israel's Olympic baseball team lines up before playing a team from the New York City Fire Department at Coney Island's Maimonides Park, July 11, 2021. (Gabe Friedman)
Israel's Olympic baseball team lines up before playing a team from the New York City Fire Department at Coney Island's Maimonides Park, July 11, 2021. (Gabe Friedman)

 

36 UNDER 36

Good morning, New York! Today The Jewish Week announces “36 Under 36,” our list of the top young Jewish changemakers of 2021. Check out our site at noon for the winners.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Police are looking for the suspect who punched a Jewish man in the chest while hurling antisemitic slurs in Brooklyn. The incident took place in Bedford-Stuyvesant early last Monday.

Israel’s Olympic baseball team beat the New York City Fire Department 12-3 in an exhibition game at Maimonides Park in Coney Island.

  • Sunday’s game was part of a short tuneup tour before baseball play begins at the Tokyo Olympics on July 27.
  • Former major leaguers Ian Kinsler, Danny Valencia and Ty Kelly all had runs batted in, and pitcher Josh Zeid struck out the side in his one inning of work.
  • Read all about Team Israel here, from our partners at JTA.
  • Fact check: The stadium is named for its sponsor, Maimonides Medical Center, and not (technically) for the medieval Jewish sage also known as the Rambam.
  • “The Great RamBambino” would be a terrific nickname for a Jewish ballplayer.
  • More Jewish baseball news: The New York Post profiles Jacob Steinmetz, an ace pitcher and Orthodox Jew from Woodmere, Long Island, who is a top prospect in this week’s Major League Baseball draft.
A 1,326-piece Lego set includes the main cast of “Seinfeld,” including Jerry, George, Elaine, Kramer and Newman. (Courtesy)

A new Lego set lets you recreate the setting and characters from “Seinfeld.”

  • Honoring the 32nd anniversary of the sitcom’s first episode, the 1,326-piece Lego set includes figures of Jerry, George, Elaine, Kramer and Newman, our friends at Kveller report.

BEYOND THE BOROUGHS, TORT EDITION

Orthodox residents of a co-op in Fort Lee, New Jersey are suing the board, saying new policies are discriminating against them.

  • The complaint: The board eliminated “Shabbat elevators,” and forbade staff from pushing elevator buttons on the Sabbath, when observant Jews refrain from using electrical switches, our colleague Shira Hanau reports.
  • The Anti-Defamation League said the board sent “a clear message that observant Jews are unwelcome.”

A Jewish-owned real estate business is suing Toms River, New Jersey, saying the township purchased a former farm in order to prevent Orthodox Jews from developing the property.

  • The township, not far from the booming Orthodox community in Lakewood, said it bought the former egg farm for $4.75 million because it needed the open space, the Forward reports.

WHAT ELSE

Several thousand people attended a rally on Sunday in Washington that denounced antisemitism as un-American and made the case that Jewish identity and support for Israel are inextricable. Our colleague Ron Kampeas reports.

REMEMBERING

Richard Lewontin, a geneticist and evolutionary biologist at Harvard University, died on July 4 at the age of 92. The New York City native, who got his master’s degree at Columbia, studied genetic diversity within populations and helped develop a technique to examine this at a molecular level, according to The Scientist. In a 2012 book review, he was skeptical of the notion that a “Jewish gene” contributes to the social and intellectual characteristics of Jews.

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Dr. David Fishman follows the journey of exile and redemption of the Yiddish poet Chaim Grade. Part of the Jewish Theological Seminary series, “A Wandering People: Jewish Journeys, Real and Imagined.” Register here. 3:30 pm.

David Ludwig Bloch, a deaf Jewish artist from Bavaria, found refuge in Shanghai following his flight from Nazi Europe in 1940. Michael Simonson, Head of Public Outreach & Archivist at the Leo Baeck Institute, will be joined by Nancy Berliner, Wu Tung Senior Curator of Chinese Art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, who will provide an analysis of Bloch’s work. Register here. 4:00 pm.

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