Some Of The Best Nazis Were ‘Moderates’
search

Some Of The Best Nazis Were ‘Moderates’

Associate Editor

The main thing is not to be phobic. We shouldn’t be Islamophobic now, or Deutschophobic in the 1930s.

Back in the 1930s, The New York Times was looking for "moderates," even in Berlin.

Better that than to believe — and prepare for — the worst.

Hitler, of course, was a bad guy. But the rest of the Nazi leadership? Moderate.

And the German people? The Germans didn’t like what the Germans were doing to the Jews, said the Times.

Rudolf Hess? "A moderating influence," said the Times (July 17, 1933).

Kristallnacht, in November 1938, is now widely seen as the beginning of the Holocaust, a time when the Nazis’ intentions became obvious and irrefutable.

And yet, just 10 days after Kristallnacht, the Times was still looking for moderates within the Nazi high command and the German people.

The Times reported (Nov. 20, 1938) that Field Marshall Hermann Goering "may become a moderating influence" on Hitler. That same day’s paper reported that "the German people as a whole look with disfavor on the pogroms… Their sentiment is reinforced by the moderating elements in politics."

The Times, like Anne Frank, believed that all people were good at heart.

Anne went to Bergen Belsen where she probably changed her mind.

The Times is still looking for moderates. This time in Islam.

Better that than to believe — and prepare for — the worst.

After 9/11, the Times thought they found a moderate in Anwar al-Awlaki. He was an American citizen, a "new generation of Muslim leader, capable of merging East and West."

Quick, build that man a mosque.

Imam Awlaki turned out to be as moderate as Hess and Goering. In Pres. Barack Obama’s finest moment, the president placed a "capture or kill" order on Awlaki’s head.

In other words, he can be shot on sight. And for good reason.

read more:
comments