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NY’s Jews and Asians in fight against hate • Candidate seeks Bukharian vote • Did the ZOA promote white supremacy?
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Daily Update

NY’s Jews and Asians in fight against hate • Candidate seeks Bukharian vote • Did the ZOA promote white supremacy?

The Gov. Mario M. Cuomo Bridge over the Hudson was lit up in blue and white Tuesday evening in celebration of Israel’s 73rd Independence Day. The initiative, which in the US was spearheaded by the Israeli-American Council, saw similar displays in cities across the globe. (Twitter)
The Gov. Mario M. Cuomo Bridge over the Hudson was lit up in blue and white Tuesday evening in celebration of Israel’s 73rd Independence Day. The initiative, which in the US was spearheaded by the Israeli-American Council, saw similar displays in cities across the globe. (Twitter)

 

Boker Tov! It’s Israel’s 73rd Independence Day. Find ways to celebrate here.

City Council candidate David Aronov wants to be the first Bukharian-American to hold office in New York. 

While the Jewish immigrants from Central Asia tend to be conservative, the 24-year-old Democrat is banking that voters in Rego Park and Kew Gardens will vote for a native son who literally speaks their language.

“Even if I don’t win, there will still be a Democrat in the seat,” he told The Jewish Week.

Rep. Grace Meng (D-Queens) and David Harris of the American Jewish Committee outlined steps to counter anti-Semitic and anti-Asian hate crimes.

In a joint op-ed in The Daily News, Meng and Harris noted that “Asian and Jewish communities have a long history in this country of standing up for one another and for the tenets of American pluralism.”

Among the policies they support are enacting legislation that would expedite and improve hate crimes reporting.

The painter Alice Neel was perhaps best known for provocative nudes, but also painted portraits of Jewish friends and neighbors whose faces reflect a complex legacy of suffering and survival.

The Jewish Week takes in the late painter’s career retrospective at The Met, which includes stories of survivors, art-world figures and political rabble-rousers.

Yeshiva University plans to eliminate in-person, undergraduate Hebrew-language programs and replace them with recorded, or “asynchronous,” virtual courses.

An administrator told The Y.U. Commentator that the new model will “provide students with greater flexibility in completing the coursework and managing their busy academic schedules.”

However, Hebrew Department faculty were dismayed at the news and “have little confidence in the success” of an asynchronous Hebrew program, the student paper reported.

Why it matters: Virtual classrooms and dire finances are expected to change the way many universities operate after the pandemic subsides.

Three NY Jewish cultural institutions were among the 225 recipients of National Endowment for the Humanities grants announced Wednesday. 

  • American Jewish Historical Society ($131,681) to preserve and digitize material documenting the work of the People’s Relief Committee for Jewish War Sufferers (1915–1924), an organization that sought to help Jewish communities and individuals in Europe during and after World War I.
  • Jewish Museum ($100,000) to implement Revisiting New York: 1962–64, a temporary exhibition exploring the cultural, historical, and aesthetic shifts in American art from the era.
  • Center for Jewish History ($153,292) to support 12 months of stipend and administrative costs.

What Else

The Zionist Organization of America is under scrutiny for having “elevated white supremacist voices.

Two liberal groups, J Street and Americans for Peace Now, are backing a House bill that would would restrict Israel from using U.S. funds to detain Palestinian minors, appropriate or destroy Palestinian property or forcibly move Palestinians, or annex Palestinian areas.

Israelis flocked to beaches and parks across the country Thursday, celebrating Independence Day after a year of coronavirus lockdown.

France’s highest court on Wednesday found that the killer of a Jewish woman in 2017 was not criminally responsible because he was high on weed.

“Amen” is a Hebrew word, not Egyptian, the AFP reminds Facebook users.

Matchmaker

Drew Feldman and Danielle Lavey found each other on the message board of the CoronaCrush Facebook group. The couple’s engagement was a match made in quarantine.

Yom Ha’atzmaut

International March of the Living’s “Salute to Israel’s 73rd Birthday” features the stories of Holocaust survivors who helped build the fledgling state and March of the Living alumni who continue to build its future. Tune in here. 1:00 pm.

The Jewish Federations of North America joins The Jewish Agency for Israel and Keren Hayesod to present farewell remarks from Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, along with a look back on his career, at its Global Yom Ha’atzmaut celebration. Join here. 7:00 pm.

Streaming Today

Searching for records of your family in Israel can be daunting. In this lecture, Garri Regev, president of the Israel Genealogy Research Association, will provide an overview of the types of records available online and where to focus your efforts. In addition, you will learn about alternatives to vital records and how you can create a vivid picture of how your ancestors lived in Israel. Pay what you wish; registration required. 2:00 pm.

Join Helen Epstein, whose 1979 book “Children of the Holocaust” was one of the first books to examine the intergenerational transmission of trauma from Holocaust survivors to their children, and Ellen Bachner Greenberg, founder of Descendants of Holocaust Survivors (2G Greater New York), for a conversation about Epstein’s life and legacy and the questions she faces today. Co-presented by the Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust and Descendants of Holocaust Survivors. $10 suggested donation; register here. 2:00 pm.

After a year of pandemic, the Jewish Theological Seminary’s Rabbi Danny Nevins will ask four JTS alumni: What comes next for Jewish life? How can the lessons of COVID strengthen the way we build community going forward? With Rabbis Sharon Brous, Menachem Creditor, Mitch Malkus and Julie Roth. Register here. 6:00 pm.

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