NYC Jewish-y Events, March 22-31
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NYC Jewish-y Events, March 22-31

Your weekly guide to educational, cultural and quirky events in New York City, with a Jewish bent.

Ariel Rivka Dance troupe at Baruch College. Arielrivkadance.com
Ariel Rivka Dance troupe at Baruch College. Arielrivkadance.com

Editor’s Picks: 

ARIEL RIVKA DANCE  AND GUESTS
Ariel Rivka Dance is an acclaimed, all-female modern dance company led by the Israeli-American couple of Ariel Grossman (choreographer) and David Homan (composer). To mark its 12th anniversary, the troupe’s gig here next week features two premieres, “Mossy” and “Rhapsody in K,” both with newly commissioned scores by Homan and Stefania de Kenessey. “Mossy” is a duet that explores the joys and frustrations of motherhood, to the thrum of de Kenessey’s electronic score. “Rhapsody in K,” a work inspired by the movements and sounds of the couple’s daughter Eva, transposes a child’s uninhibited movements to adults. “It’s exploring our child-side and what it can do for us as adults,” Grossman told The Jewish Week. “She” (2018) brings postpartum depression to the fore through dynamic movement and the beat of a breast pump. Various guest artists join the troupe. —  Thursday- Friday, March 28-29, 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, March 30, at 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Baruch College, One Bernard Baruch Way (55 Lexington Avenue at 24th St.), 646-312-1000, baruch.cuny.edu.

LAST CHANCE — IMAGINING MADOFF

Ponzi-schemer Bernard Madoff is in prison, determined to control his own narrative for history. He dictates to a visiting biographer stories about his childhood, his family, women, money and an all-night meeting he had with Holocaust survivor and poet, Solomon Galkin. Last chance to see the show, which critics hailed as “intriguingly exercised” (Washington Post) and “rich with dramatic tension” (Tampa Bay Times). — Through Saturday, March 23, 59E59, 59 E. 59th St., 59e59.org.

AND THE ANGELS SING

From the 1920s to ’50s, Jewish composers and musicians were inspired by their fellow New Yorkers’ jazz, swing and blues traditions. In turn, African-American musicians were getting inspired by Yiddish culture. Composer, violinist and bandleader Yale Strom, a klezmer revival pioneer, explores the energetic and soulful crossover of blues, jazz, Jewish music and Sephardic motifs. — Sunday, March 24, 3-4:30 p.m., Museum at Eldridge Street, 12 Eldridge St., (212) 219-0302, eldridgestreet.org.

Theater

YIDDISH FIDDLER, OFF BROADWAY

“Fiddler” in Yiddish, the unexpected runaway hit that both delighted and choked up audiences at Museum of Jewish History, is now Off-Broadway. Directed by the acclaimed Joel Grey, a rich Yiddish translation by the late Shraga Friedman adds new depth to the iconic musical. With English and Russian supertitles. — Stage 42, 422 W. 42nd St., (212) 239-6200, Telecharge.com.

A JEWISH JOKE
In this new Off-Broadway “drama about comedy,” Bernie Lutz is a curmudgeonly Jewish comedy screenwriter from MGM who comes up against the Communist blacklist in 1950s Hollywood. He has to decide what’s more important — his friends or his livelihood. — Through Sunday, March 31, Lion Theatre @ Theatre Row, 410 W. 42nd St., telecharge.com.

Dance

ANNUAL ISRAEL FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL
The 68th annual installment features performances by Galgaley Rishon (First Wheels), a wheelchair dance troupe from Israel. The company will be joined by multiple generations of dancers and singers from the East Coast, exemplifying the evolving folk dance culture. — Sunday, March 24, 3 p.m., The Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College, 524 W. 59th St., (917) 689-7677, israelidanceinstitute.org.

Film

RBG

Betsy West and Julie Cohen’s Oscar-nominated documentary explores 84-year-old Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s unique life, career and legacy. Co-produced by Storyville Films and CNN Films. Following the film, director/producer Julie Cohen and associate producer Nadine Natour discuss their own journey making the film. — Monday, March 25, 6:30 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

WORKING WOMAN

Orna, a mother of three young children whose husband’s business is struggling, returns to the workplace to help support her family. She lands a job with a former army superior and soon experiences escalating sexual harassment from her boss. — Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 2 p.m., Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave., (646) 505-4444, jccmanhattan.org.  

Music

HAZAMIR GALA
HaZamir is the international musical youth movement of choral chapters for Jewish teens in the U.S. and Israel. The HaZamir Annual Festival brings teens from chapters around the world for a weekend retreat, culminating in a gala concert at Lincoln Center. This year’s event honors Nurit Hirsh, an Israel Prize-winner and one of Israel’s most prolific songwriters. —  Sunday, March 31, 4 p.m., David Geffen Hall, Lincoln Center, 10 Lincoln Center Plaza, lincolncenter.org.

STERN COLLEGE NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE-IN-RESIDENCE
The ensemble-in-residence of Stern College for Women performs the work of 20th-century and contemporary Jewish composers. — Thursday, March 28, 7:30 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

SHIRA

Hailed by The Times for her “winning voice and an enigmatically expressive smile,” Israeli-American singer-songwriter Shira Averbuch — — or just Shira, going by her stage-name — hits N.Y. performing tunes from her debut album, “Till the Sun Comes.” Inspired by the likes of Joni Mitchell and Norah Jones, Averbuch’s CD delivers its nostalgic punch with a feather-light sweetness. She’ll be joined by Yotam Ben Horin, lead singer and bassist for the Israeli punk band Useless ID.  — Saturday, March 23, 10 p.m., Rockwood Music Hall, 196 Allen St., (212) 477-4155, rockwoodmusichall.com.

HOT JAZZ @A COOL SHUL

The Actors’ Temple is celebrating its 102nd anniversary with a benefit gala, featuring a performance by veteran jazz and Broadway staple Tony Middleton and his trio. Tickets are $250-$1,000, including cocktails, plentiful hot and cold canapés, music, wine, entertainment and more. — Monday, March 25, 6:30-9:30 p.m., The Actors’ Temple, 339 W. 47th St., (917) 359-1249, theactorstemple.org/events.

Talk

CONFRONTING WITH PRIMO LEVI
As a student in 1980s Italy, Cheryl Chaffin discovered the writing of Primo Levi, the eminent Italian-Jewish chemist, poet and Holocaust chronicler. In 2014, Chaffin traveled to Poland as an Auschwitz Jewish Center Fellow and discovered Levi anew. She discusses “After Poland: A Memoir Because of Primo Levi,” her “literary love story of one woman’s confrontation with the trauma of history.” — Thursday, March 28, 2-3:30 p.m., Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Place, (646) 437-4202, mjhnyc.org

A REVOLUTION IN THE NAME OF TRADITION

Naomi Seidman, author of “Sarah Schenirer and Bais Yaakov: A Revolution in the Name of Tradition,” will discuss the emergence of the Bais Yaakov schools in interwar Poland as it began its growth from a one-room school in Schenirer’s living quarters to a school system with over 200 schools worldwide. Features a concert of period music performed by Basya Schechter and Pharaoh’s Daughter. — Sunday, March 24, 6 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

Exhibitions

KINDERTRANSPORT

Just weeks after Kristallnacht (Nov. 9-10, 1938), the first group of Jewish refugee children arrived in the United Kingdom. The Leo Baeck Institute and the Yeshiva University Museum co-sponsor a new exhibition exploring this remarkable effort, one that saved some 10,000 children, many of whom never saw their parents again. — Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (800) 838-3006, cjh.org.

To publish events, submit them to jewishweekcalendar@gmail.com two weeks or more in advance. We cannot guarantee inclusion due to space limitations. Since scheduling changes may occur, we recommend contacting the venue before heading out to an event.

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