NYC Jewish-y Events, March 1-10
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NYC Jewish-y Events, March 1-10

Your weekly guide to educational, cultural and quirky events in New York City, with a Jewish bent.

Hubbard Street Dance doing Ohad Naharin.
Hubbardstreetdance.org
Hubbard Street Dance doing Ohad Naharin. Hubbardstreetdance.org

Editor’s Picks:

DECADANCE/CHICAGO
First choreographed in 2000 and recreated every decade since with different iterations, Ohad Naharin’s “Decadance” weaves together segments from his past creations, remaking them into a new work. Naharin, former artistic director of Israel’s Batsheva Dance Company, is one of the country’s leading cultural exports. His latest installment of the work, called “Decadance/Chicago” and performed by the highly acclaimed Hubbard Street Dance Chicago troupe, features remixed segments from “Anaphase” (1993), “Zachacha” (1998), “Naharin’s Virus” (2001), “Three” (2004), “Telophaza” (2006), “George & Zalman” (2006), “Max” (2007), “Seder” (2007) and “Sadeh21” (2011). The Chicago Tribune described it as “an exciting, sensual, daring block of human movement, taken from a fresh quarry, ready to build.” — Wednesday, March 6-Sunday, March 10, Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Ave., joyce.org.

ELI DEGIBRI QUARTET

Among the first jazz musicians to migrate here from Israel, composer and big-toned saxophonist Eli Degibri is counted among the pioneers of Israeli/Middle Eastern jazz fusion. Degibri, who logged a number of formative years in the bands of famed pianist Herbie Hancock and drummer Al Foster, draws inspiration from the patriotic Israeli hymns of the ’50s and the ’60s, distinct for their lyricism and emotiveness. Degibri’s 2016 album — “Cliff Hangin’” — received five stars from DownBeat magazine, which called it “a masterpiece.” He’s currently working on his next release, a tribute to legendary saxophonist and one of Degibri’s first inspirations, Hank Mobley. — Tuesday, March 5, 7:30-10 p.m., Smalls Jazz Club, 183 W. 10th St., (646) 476-4346, smallslive.com.

NOA

Known best by her stage name Noa, Achinoam Nini is an A-list Israeli performer and a leading peace activist who has represented Israel alongside Palestinian singer-songwriter Mira Awad at the Eurovision song contest. This month marks the international release of Noa’s new project, “Letters to Bach,” in which she sets lyrics to 11 of the Baroque master’s pieces, and sings them with Gil Dor, who has arranged and produced the album. Noa will perform selections from the project here next week. — Monday, March 4, 8 p.m., City Winery, 155 Varick St., (212) 608-0555, citywinery.com.

Dance

ONE. ONE & ONE

Choreographed by Noa Wertheim and set to a powerful score by Avi Belleli, the noted Israeli dance company Vertigo performs “One. One & One.” Unfolding on a dirt-covered stage, the work creates a sensory experience as it explores the individual’s desire for wholeness and spiritual connection to the natural world. — Tuesday-Wednesday, March 5-Thursday, March 6, 7:30 p.m., Baryshnikov Arts Center, 450 W. 37th St., (646) 731-3200, bacnyc.org.

Theater

YIDDISH FIDDLER, OFF BROADWAY
“Fiddler” in Yiddish, the unexpected runaway hit that both delighted and choked up audiences at Museum of Jewish History, is now Off-Broadway. Directed by the acclaimed Joel Grey, a rich Yiddish translation by the late Shraga Friedman adds new depth to the iconic musical. With English and Russian supertitles. — Stage 42, 422 W. 42nd St., (212) 239-6200, Telecharge.com.

Film

EAST AND WEST

Celebrating the 121st birthday of Yiddish theater and film star Molly Picon, this screening of the silent classic “East and West” (1923) is accompanied by a live score performed by clarinetist Michael Winograd and featuring the composer of the original score for the 1991 re-mastered film, Pete Sokolow. — Sunday, March 3, 4 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

THE LAST

The survivors of four generations of a Jewish family are rocked to their core when the family’s beloved 92-year-old matriarch makes a stunning confession. Screening followed by Q&A with the director and cast members Rebecca Schull, Jill Durso, AJ Cedeño and Julie Fain Lawrence. — Tuesday, March 5, 7-9 p.m., Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave., jccmanhattan.org.

JOSEPH PULITZER: VOICE OF THE PEOPLE

Pulitzer began as a penniless Jewish immigrant from Hungary and grew into one of America’s most admired and feared media figures. Oren Rudavsky’s documentary tells the rare story of the man behind the prize, who spoke of “fake news” and the importance of freedom of the press over a century ago. — Friday March 1- Thursday, March 7, Quad Cinema, 34 W. 13th St., (212) 255-2243, quadcinema.com

Music

THE LAND OF ISRAEL
Israeli singer Ariella Edvy and the MusicTalks Ensemble embark on a musical journey through Israel’s diverse sites and environments. Through an array of site-specific songs, host Elad Kabilio offers a fresh auditory experience of Israel’s landscapes. — Monday, March 4, 7 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

JAKE SHULMAN-MENT’S “MIDWOOD”

Led by the talented crossover violinist, Midwood traverses rock, avant-garde, classical and Romanian folk music — all finding a place in the expressive language of klezmer. Part of the NY Klezmer Series, the concert will be preceded by an instrumental music workshop and followed by a jam session. — Thursday, March 7, 6:30-8 p.m. workshop, 8:30 p.m. concert, 9:45-11:45 p.m. jam session, Town & Village Synagogue, Social Hall, 334 E. 14th St., nyklezmer.com.

AL NAHAROT BAVEL
The ARTEK and Parthenia ensembles perform music by Jewish composers of the Renaissance and Baroque. Madrigals, fantasies and more by Italy’s Salomone Rossi and the Lupo and Bassano musical dynasties in England. The concert will be preceded with an introduction by historian Jody Hirsh. — Sunday, March 10, 3:15 p.m. Pre-concert talk, 4 p.m. concert, Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

ROTEM COHEN


The Israeli singer-songwriter, whose Hebrew-Spanish hits have been performed by Latin pop star Enrique Iglesias, debuts his Israeli-Latin crossover in the U.S. —  Thursday, March 7, 8 p.m., Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, (212) 864-5400, symphonyspace.org.

Talk

AMERICA’S JEWISH WOMEN: A HISTORY FROM COLONIAL TIMES TO TODAY
Pamela Nadell’s “America’s Jewish Women” examines the history of how Jewish women have maintained their identity and influenced social activism as they wrote themselves into American history. Panelists include author Nadell, Barbara Dobkin (Ma’yan) and former Forward editor Jane Eisner. — Tuesday, March 5,  7 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

AUTHOR TALK: MATTI FRIEDMAN
Matti Friedman’s new book, “Spies of No Country: Secret Lives at the Birth of Israel,” tells the story of four of Israel’s first spies. He talks with author Lucette Lagnado. A reception, book sale, and signing follow the program. — Tuesday, March 12, 7 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., programs.cjh.org.

ISRAEL FORUM: MILLENNIAL VOICES ON JEWISH IDENTITY
Is anti-Zionism anti-Semitism? Is BDS a legitimate political strategy or something more sinister? Simone Zimmerman, co-founder, IfNotNow; Avi Mayer, the AJC’s managing director of global communications; and Carly Pildis, senior associate at RESULTS, discuss these fraught questions with The Times’ Bari Weiss in the latest installment of Israel Forum. — Tuesday, March 5, 7-9 p.m., Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave., jccmanhattan.org.

Exhibitions

SOL
Israeli-American artist Daniel Rozin probes the relationship between the function of natural and mechanical structures. The exhibited works employ a combination of custom software and organic materials to mimic and interact with the viewer’s body in space. — Through March 17, Bitforms Gallery, 131 Allen St., (212) 366-6939, bitforms.art

KINDERTRANSPORT
Just weeks after Kristallnacht (Nov. 9-10, 1938), the first group of Jewish refugee children arrived in the United Kingdom. The Leo Baeck Institute and the Yeshiva University Museum co-sponsor a new exhibition exploring this remarkable effort, one that saved some 10,000 children, many of whom never saw their parents again. — Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (800) 838-3006, cjh.org.

To publish events, submit them to jewishweekcalendar@gmail.com two weeks or more in advance. We cannot guarantee inclusion due to space limitations. Since scheduling changes may occur, we recommend contacting the venue before heading out to an event.

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