LGBT-Jew! Top 5 Jewish LGBTQ+ Pride Events In NYC
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LGBT-Jew! Top 5 Jewish LGBTQ+ Pride Events In NYC

Looking to celebrate Pride Month with a Jewish twist? Here's how.

“Yesterday’s struggle is today’s heritage” happens to be the tagline of NYC Pride’s array of events and initiatives recognizing June as Pride Month, but it could just as easily refer to the Jewish people’s resilient history. For Jews who also identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community, as well as their allies, Pride Month is the perfect time to explore and celebrate both identities. So without further ado, here are 5 events aiming to help people do just that.

5. Safer Sex Packet Assembly Line at Congregation Beit Simchat Torah
Thursday, June 18th, 6:30 PM at 57 Bethune St

Flickr

A synagogue for people of all sexual orientations and gender identities, CBST will assemble 1,500 Jewish safer sex packets to distribute along 5th Avenue during the NYC Pride March, marking the completion of their Jewish Action Month. What makes these packets Jewish, exactly? Director of Social Justice Programming Rabbi David Dunn Bauer says they will include a list of 7 spiritual safer sex teachings from Jewish tradition such as Torah, Mishna, and Gemara, in addition to the standard condoms and dental dams. To make sure there will be enough pizza and refreshments to go around, RSVP to Red Ribbon, CBST’s committee for HIV/AIDS awareness, at RedRibbon@cbst.org. (Photo: Flickr)

4. Pride Shabbat Dinner at Town and Village Synagogue
Friday, June 19th, 6 PM services and 7:15 cocktail hour, dinner and program at 334 E. 14th St

Gei’im ba-Village, T&V Synagogue’s LGBTQ+ outreach program, will host its third annual Pride Shabbat Dinner honoring LGBTQ+ Jews by Choice. Aside from the kosher dinner buffet, the evening will feature a panel discussion entitled “LGBT By Nature / Jew By Choice.” A Conservative, egalitarian synagogue, they ask that guests refrain from using electronic devices inside the synagogue on Shabbat and suggest bringing a business card to help new friends stay in touch. To sign up, visit the Eventbrite site and grab the early bird discount while it lasts. (Photo: Flickr)

3. Nehirim Family Program
Sunday, June 21st, 10 AM-2 PM in Fort Tryon Park

The finale in a series of monthly programming for LGBTQ+ Jewish families, Nehirim will host a get-together for both parents and kids to play outside, learn about upcoming Jewish fast days and worldwide hunger, and connect with each other. Though Sunday’s event is the culmination of a year’s worth of family programs centered around the shmita (agricultural sabbatical) year and recyclable crafts, newcomers are welcome, as well. For more information or to RSVP, contact Jacqui Sellin at jacqui@nehirim.org. (Photo: Nehirim)

2. Hebro Pride
Wednesday, June 24th, 6-10 PM at the Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Ave at 92nd St

Hebro Pride’s open wine and beer bar will be less family friendly. But then again, it is a nightlife group known for parties that attract hundreds of gay Jews—and even a few gentiles looking for a nice Jewish boy— affectionately dubbed “bagel chasers” by Hebro founder Jayson Littman (center). Serving as the backdrop to the festivities, The Jewish Museum’s exhibit, “Repetition and Difference”, explores the nuances of individuality, conformity, and invention within collections of repetitious art and ritual objects. For more information or to purchase tickets, see myhebro.com. (Photo: Hebro)

1. NYC Pride March
Sunday, June 28th, 12PM from 36th St and 5th Ave to Christopher and Greenwich Streets

Pride Month wouldn’t be complete without the annual NYC Pride March. The parade commemorates the riots following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn widely regarded as the catalyst of the American gay rights movement. Join more than 55 floats, 300 organizations, and thousands of people in decorating the streets of New York with rainbow flags and copious amounts of body paint. (For the full list of groups participating, Jewish and otherwise, click here.) No RSVP needed for this one – the March is free and open to all. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

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