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AOC, Bowman back Israel critic’s bill • Jews on both sides of CUNY clash • Hate crimes and the mayor’s race
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AOC, Bowman back Israel critic’s bill • Jews on both sides of CUNY clash • Hate crimes and the mayor’s race

FLAG DAY: Children at HANC West Hempstead Early Childhood Center on Long Island celebrated Yom Ha'atzmaut, Israel's Independence Day, by creating Israeli flags and and birthday crowns. (Courtesy)
FLAG DAY: Children at HANC West Hempstead Early Childhood Center on Long Island celebrated Yom Ha'atzmaut, Israel's Independence Day, by creating Israeli flags and and birthday crowns. (Courtesy)

 

Shabbat Shalom! Every Friday, The Jewish Week emails a downloadable, printable digest of the week’s best stories, perfect for Shabbat reading. Sign up for “The Jewish Week/end” here. Get today’s edition here.

How would New York’s next mayor fight hate crimes?

To find out, The Jewish Week asked them just that in a questionnaire we sent to all eight major candidates. All agreed that addressing hate crimes was a priority, but differed on the role of the NYPD and where the emphasis on prevention should be placed. Read about their responses here.

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-Bronx/Queens) and Jamaal Bowman (D-Bronx/Westchester) signed onto a bill conditioning U.S. aid to Israel over its treatment of Palestinians.

The bill introduced by Rep. Betty McCollum (D-Minn.) has the backing of progressive groups like J Street and Americans for Peace Now, while center and right-wing pro-Israel groups, including AIPAC, forcefully oppose.

A federal judge threw out the appeal of two men convicted of carrying out fiery attacks on Jewish communities in New Jersey in 2011.

Aakash Dalal and Anthony Graziano were 19 at the time of the attacks, which included the firebombing of two synagogues and a rabbi’s home in Rutherford.

A state appeals court rejected arguments by their lawyers concerning evidence, the use of the state anti-terrorism law and the length of their 35-year sentence.

A new exhibit at The Jewish Museum shows how how exiled and émigré artists shaped the photography and graphic design of the American magazine.

“Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine” includes work by Alexey Brodovitch and Alexander Liberman, who escaped a smoldering Europe to help create a distinct mid-20th century aesthetic.

Opinion

The controversial IHRA definition of anti-Semitism puts Jews on the wrong side of the First Amendment, writes Jerome Chanes, a senior fellow at the Center for Jewish Studies of the CUNY Graduate Center. The definition “would paint an overly broad indictment of anti-Israel rhetoric,” which “could result in the stifling of free speech when it comes to Israel and the Palestinians,” Chanes writes in a Jewish Week op-ed.

Related: The Forward reports on the ugly battle over the IHRA definition at CUNY, which pitted different Jewish student factions against one another.

Shabbat Shalom

If your walls could talk, what would they say? This week’s Torah portion, writes Rabbi Matthew Berkowitz, is a poetic commentary on the idea of home: the place that bears witness to our best, and worst, behaviors.

More wisdom: Avigayil Halpern, a rabbinical student at the Hadar Institute, says the portion also provides a model for handling those accused of sexual misconduct: “[F]or someone not to be welcomed in communal spaces after they do harm is necessary and important,” she writes. “Without it, there can be no moving forward.”

Even more wisdom: Rabbi David Wolpe writes about the limits of material desire.

Streaming

The 10th Annual Jewish University for a Day presented by Stony Brook University’s Hillel includes a full day of courses. Writer Abigail Pogrebin’s plenary presentation, “18 Questions About God: My Life as a Wondering Jew,” will be one of seven course options, all recorded and made available for 72 hours. Presenters include long-time New Yorker cartoonist and editor Bob Mankoff; Leonard Cohen biographer Michael Posner; and Anna Correa, a graduate student at Columbia University, who will explores the story of hidden Jews in Latin America. $45 for an individual/or joint household, $18 for Stony Brook alumni, free for current students. Register here. Sunday, beginning 9:30 am.

Join Congregation Beth Sholom of Teaneck and the New Israel Fund for a conversation with Shira Ben Sasson Furstenberg, NIF’s associate director in Israel, to hear about the fight for religious freedom and social change in Israel and efforts to build a more just and equal Israel. Sign up here. Sunday, 10:00 am.

The National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene presents “The Bird of the Ghetto,” the only play by Chava Rosenfarb, one of the greatest post-war Yiddish writers. Free streaming starts on Sunday at 2:00 pm.

Survivors of the Holocaust and the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda will gather to commemorate Yom HaShoah and Kwibuka 27, the Rwandan anniversary of the massacre. Survivors Celine Uwineza (Kigali) and Maritza Shelley (New York) will speak about finding common ground between communities that have survived genocide. Presented by the Museum of Jewish Heritage in partnership with The Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village and the Genocide Survivors Foundation. Register here. Sunday, 2:00 pm.

Candlelighting, Readings

Friday, April 16, 2021
Iyar 4, 5781

Light candles at 7:19 pm

Saturday, April 17, 2021
Iyar 5, 5781

Torah Reading: Tazria-Metzora: Leviticus 12:1-15:33
Haftarah: Kings II 7:3-20

Shabbat ends 8:20 pm

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