With Passover coming, I wanted to point out a few interesting articles about non-Jewish guests at the seder.

This humorous essay on Tablet chronicles one man’s attempt to prepare an appropriate seder appetizer. My favorite part:

"After long hours online, I could point out the differences between Ashkenazi and Sephardic rules. I could recite a list of kosher animals and explain why camel doesn’t qualify but giraffe does. (In short, the camel chews its cud, but doesn’t have a cloven hoof. The giraffe ruminates and has the right feet.) I had learned, from the essays of two different experts, what to do if I found a blood spot in an egg. (One said if the spot was in the white, it could be removed. The other said the whole egg had to be thrown out.)

‘Do you think I should kasher my utensils?’ I emailed Matt. ‘And do you avoid kitniyot for Passover, or is rice OK?’

‘You’ll have to ask my father,’ he replied, befuddled. ‘And, failing that, a rabbi.’"

The Jewish Outreach Institute’s blog has been featuring Passover blog entries by participants in the Mothers Circle, a group for gentile women raising Jewish kids. Among my favorites are a description of the assimilated Jewish husband’s family’s annual Easter egg hunt:

I still wince when recalling one year when they had an Easter egg hunt in my mother-in-law’s front yard. By not being Orthodox (with many Hassidic), my husband’s family was in the distinct minority. Having an egg hunt in the midst of wig-wearing women with long skirts pushing carriages brimming with children made me tuck in my long, straight blonde hair and avert my blue eyes. If I had a chance, I’d have worn a sandwich board which read: “Don’t blame the shiksa!”

And in a burst of self-promotion, I’d like to direct you to my 2008 column, "Strangers At A Strange Meal."

Happy Passover!