EXILE IS HOME
The personal history of Oded Halahmy, one of New York’s most acclaimed Israeli-American sculptors, has been shaped by exile, migration and travels. Halahmy was born in Iraq, moved with his family to Israel in the 1950s, was educated at St. Martin’s School of Art in London and currently travels between homes here and in old Jaffa. Noted for his playful figurative sculptures in wood and bronze, Halahmy fills his work with images evocative of palm trees, doves, pomegranates, temples and age-old symbols. “Exile is Home” includes over 100 works representing his work from the mid-1960s to the present. — Through July 1, Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, (718) 681-6000, bronxmuseum.org.

HADAG NAHASH


“It’s not my revolution if you can’t dance to it” is the opening sentence and key sentiment of Hadag Nahash’s latest album, “Welcome to Israel.” A hip hop/funk band with strong political messaging and archetypal touches of Middle Eastern and world music, the group is a fixture in Israel. Now in its 22nd year, the sextet has just released its tenth album and is about to embark on a world tour. Part of Brooklyn’s Israel @ 70 celebrations. — Wednesday, May 2, 8 p.m., East Midwood Jewish Center, 1625 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, teevtix.com.

MR. GAGA

Tomer Heymann’s documentary tells the story of Ohad Naharin, renowned choreographer and artistic director of the Batsheva Dance Company, one of Israel’s top cultural exports. At 22, he cut his dance teeth with Martha Graham, but he eventually returned to Israel to take over Batsheva; there he developed his signature movement technique called Gaga. A taskmaster (the film opens with him coaching a dancer to fall time after time) and a provocateur (in the late-’90s he pulled the company out of an Israel-at-50 show because his costumes had been deemed too racy), Naharin has stuck to a singular, often exhilarating vision. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Heymann and Naharin, moderated by Ambassador Ido Aharoni. — Saturday, May 5, 7 p.m., Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center, 1 E. 65th St., (212) 507-9580, aicf.org.

Theater

GOLDSTEIN

Louis Goldstein has written a tell-all family memoir. The book is a best-seller — but is it true? Directed by Brad Rouse, with musical staging by Sarah O’Gleby, “Goldstein” drives home the message that families are complicated, the truth is multifaceted and forgiveness is key.— Through July, Actors Temple Theatre, 339 W. 47 St., (212) 239-6200, Goldsteinmusical.com.  

THE YIDDISH KING LEAR
Written in 1892 by the “Jewish Shakespeare,” Jacob Gordin, the play centers on Reb Dovidl Moysheles, a Russian-Jewish merchant used and abandoned by all but one of his daughters. — Friday, April 27-May 18, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Metropolitan Playhouse, 220 E. Fourth St.,  (212) 995-8410, metropolitanplayhouse.org.

ADMISSIONS
Director Joshua Harmon’s (“Bad Jews”) new satire about the values of liberal white America. Sherri Rosen-Mason (Jessica Hecht) is head of the admissions at a New England prep school. Alongside her husband, the school’s headmaster, she’s fighting to diversify the school’s largely white student body. But when their only son sets his sights on Yale, personal ambition and lofty lefty values collide. — Through May 6, Lincoln Center Theater, 150 W. 65th St., (212) 239-6200 or visit lct.org.

Film

TO DUST
Director Shawn Snyder’s dark buddy comedy tracks an unlikely friendship between a biology teacher (Matthew Broderick) and a grieving chasidic widower (Geza Rohrig), as they explore the decomposition process of his late wife. Part of the Tribeca Film Festival. — Saturday, April 28, 9 p.m., Cinépolis Chelsea 7, 260 W. 23rd St., (212) 691-5519, tribecafilm.com.

RBG

At  84, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has developed a breathtaking legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. A documentary from Betsy West and Julie Cohen, “RBG” explores Ginsburg’s unique life, career and legacy. Co-produced by Storyville Films and CNN Films. — Opens Friday, May 4, in wide release.

THE FIGHT FOR OUR LIVES

A  cast of distinguished scholars and experts traces the emergence of anti-Western ideas and movements, and their subsequent penetration into Western academia, politics, and society. With introductory remarks by producer-director Gloria Z. Greenfield and post-screening remarks by British journalist Melanie Philips and political scientist Emanuele Ottolenghi. Moderated by Algemeiner editor Dovid Efune. — Tuesday, May 1, 7:30 p.m., Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, (212) 864-5400, symphonyspace.org

Music

CAFE SHAHOR HAZAK

Born in Ethiopia and raised in Israel, the rap duo of cousins Uri Almo and Ilak Sahalo make up Café Shahor Hazak (“Strong Black Coffee” in Hebrew), one of Israel’s most popular young hip-hop groups. —Sunday, April 29, doors 6 p.m., concert 7 p.m., Café Wha?, 115 Macdougal St., (212) 254-3706, cafewha.com.

THE CANTORS: IN CONCERT, VOICES OF A GENERATION
A group of highly esteemed cantors comes together in song. The concert will feature music central to the Reform Jewish cantorial tradition, pulling from the best of Chazzanut, Yiddish and Ladino as well as Broadway favorites. Headliners include Daniel Singer of Stephen Wise Free Synagogue; Todd Kipnes of Shaaray Tefila; Irena Altshul of Temple Israel; Shira Ginsberg of East End Temple and more. — Wednesday, May 2, 7:30 p.m., Congregation Rodeph Sholom, Seven W. 83rd St., (646) 454-3058, rodephsholom.org/cantors.

MAYA ISAC


The Israeli-American singer/songwriter initially made a name for herself busking on the streets of Israel. Her debut album, “Safe & Sound” (2011), hit gold in Israel, and her second LP, “All of the Miles,” won The NYC Akademia award for Best Folk Album of 2016. — Wednesday, May 9, 8:30 p.m., City Winery, 155 Varick St., (212) 608-0555, citywinery.com.

MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF ISRAEL AT 70
Featuring  Yitzchak Meir Helfgot, chief cantor of the Israel Defense Forces; Shai Abramson, Maestro Russell Ger, Park East Choir, and the children’s choir of the Rabbi Arthur Schneier Park East Day School. — Thursday, May 3, 7 p.m., Park East Synagogue, 163 E. 67th St., parkeastsynagogue.org

DUDU TASSA AND THE KUWAITIS

A prominent singer-songwriter and guitarist on Israel’s rock scene, Tassa’s latest project is a tribute to his grandfather and great-uncle. Known as the Al-Kuwaiti Brothers, they were highly popular composers/musicians in Baghdad during the first half of the 20th century. Dudu interprets their songs in Arabic and Hebrew and integrates new sounds into his rock band line-up, creating a new style he dubs “Iraq’n Roll.” — Friday, May 4, midnight, Joe’s Pub, 425 Lafayette St., (212) 539-8778, publictheater.org.

Special Event

JEWISH COMIC CON
Hosted by Congregation Kol Israel, in conjunction with the Brooklyn Jewish Art Gallery, the second Jewish Comics Con features appearances by both new and established Jewish artists, special guest speakers and panel discussions. “Pow!!!” an exhibition of superhero-inspired artwork, is part of the event and will remain on display through Friday, May 25. — Sunday, April 29, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Congregation Kol Israel, 603 St John’s Pl., Brooklyn, (917) 648-4036,  jewishcomiccon.org.

Talk

JEWISH MUSIC AND HUMOR
The Jewish Music Forum, a project of the American Society for Jewish Music, presents a daylong conference exploring how music and comedy interact in Jewish subcultures. Featuring noted scholars of Jewish music. — Sunday, April 29, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8301, jewishmusicforum.org.

SISTERHOOD OF PAIN AND HOPE
Four bereaved Israeli and Palestinian mothers, founders of “The Parents Circle – Families Forum,” discuss their project and hopes for peace. — Monday, April 30, 7 p.m., Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center, 1 E. 65th St., (212) 507-9580, emanuelstrickernyc.org.

ISRAEL DIASPORA RELATIONS: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE
A panel of noted Jewish professors, writers, journalists and artists explores the historical connection between the Jewish homeland and diaspora, beginning with the connection between Babylon and Jerusalem and culminating with today’s Israel-Diaspora relations. — Thursday, May 3, 6:30 p.m., Center for Jewish History, 15 W.16 St., (212) 294-8301, cjh.org.

ISRAEL: A CONVERSATION ACROSS GENERATIONS
Today’s Jewish young people grow up on a narrative of Israel as an occupier and oppressor, while their parents and grandparents grew up seeing Israel as miracle of justice and hope. How can they communicate across such a strong divide? Two father-daughter pairs — Professor Jonathan Sarna and Leah Sarna, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin and Naomi Teluskin – will discuss. Moderated by author Abigail Pogrebin. — Tuesday, May 8, 7 p.m., Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center, One E. 65th St., (212) 507-9580, emanuelstrieckernyc.org

ISRAEL @ 70 W DANNY YATOM
70 years after Israel’s independence, the Jewish state faces a Middle East landscape that grows more complicated by the day. Former Mossad Director and Member of Knesset Danny Yatom will address Israel’s security challenges regarding Syria, Hezbollah, Iran and Hamas, as well as the uncertain future facing the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Moderated by Laura E. Adkins, deputy opinion editor at The Forward. — Wednesday, May 2, 6:30 – 8 p.m., B’nai Jeshurun NYC 257 W 88th St, (212) 787-7600, communications@bj.org.

Exhibitions

HOME: LENS ON ISRAEL
In a photographic tour celebrating Israel’s 70th birthday, explore the many communities that dwell side-by-side within Israel’s meager 8,000 square miles. Once a month for seven months, the exhibition will rotate through Israel’s diverse communities; this month’s lens is on elderly Jews and Holocaust survivors in Dimona. — Through May 23, Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center, 1 E. 65th St., (212) 507-9580, emanuelstrieckernyc.org.

VIOLATED!
Tackling the charged topic of sexual violence during the Holocaust, “Violated! Women in Holocaust and Genocide” features 47 bold works on sexual violation by 30 artists. Alongside pieces dealing with the Holocaust are some about later genocides and ethnic cleansings — in Bosnia, Darfur, Eritrea, Guatemala, Iraq, Nigeria and Rwanda. — Through May 12, Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Gallery, 31 Mercer St., (212) 226-3232, feldmangallery.com.

To publish events, submit them to jewishweekcalendar@gmail.com two weeks or more in advance. We cannot guarantee inclusion due to space limitations. Since scheduling changes may occur, we recommend contacting the venue before heading out to an event.