I am writing in response to Gary Rosenblatt’s column that explores the question of the religious right ignoring Trump’s “immoral behavior” (“How Religious Leaders Dismiss Trump’s Misbehavior,” April 6). Perhaps Trump is not as “immoral” as Rosenblatt perceives. I would question if, indeed, he is a perpetual liar. I have heard that concept before from my liberal associates. Yet when I question the source of that label and justification for it, I am met with silence. I am also astonished that Rosenblatt denies the existence of “fake news.” That can be validated by listening to both sides of a political argument and then determine the truth from actual data that cannot be dismissed. What is identified as “news” can often be a lie or a distortion.

I cannot speak for the Evangelicals but the Jewish bias toward the left is understandable. I refer to non-Orthodox Jews.

In the last election 70 percent of Jews voted for Hillary Clinton. Barack Obama did better with Jews than any other ethnic group. [Editor’s Note: In fact, Obama received 95 percent of the African-American and 78 percent of the Jewish vote in 2008; in 2012, Obama received 93 percent of the African-American vote, 71 percent of the Hispanic vote, 73 percent of the Asian vote and 69 percent of the Jewish vote.] In Congress, 28 Democrats are Jewish and only two are Republican. Many of the liberal pundits in the media are invariably African American or Jewish.

Norman Podhoretz has written extensively on this phenomenon. Why do Jews gravitate toward liberalism? Several theories include the long history of oppression and identification with the underdog. There is a feeling of kinship among Jews, and it is more important whom we vote with than whom we vote for. Non-Orthodox Jews have more faith in government than in religion. The Jews were behind the labor unions.

There are a myriad of other reasons why Jewish liberalism is so prevalent. However, I believe that a viable newspaper like The Jewish Week should be more evenhanded. Bias is not news.